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Union temporarily pulls bid to organize Delta flight attendants
2 years ago

Union temporarily pulls bid to organize Delta flight attendants

An aerospace union has temporarily withdrawn its application with federal labor regulators to organize Delta flight attendants.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) said in a statement Tuesday that it would delay an unionization vote of workers for the Atlanta-based carrier’s flight attendants because it believed a number of authorization cards were submitted with insufficient or inaccurate information.

“We thought it best to take the course of action to withdraw and go back and renew the campaign,” a union spokesman told Bloomberg News. “This campaign is not over by any means.”

Labor organizing campaigns have three phases: a card campaign, in which at least 50 percent of a company’s workers must demonstrate a showing of interest in collective bargaining by signing authorization cards; certification by federal labor investigators at the National Mediation Board; and finally an election.

The IAM petitioned the NMB in January for an election, telling authorities it had collected authorization cards from roughly 60 percent of Delta’s 20,000 flight attendants. But Tuesday’s announcement means union officials worried nearly half of those cards would not stand up to review by NMB investigators.

By withdrawing the application, the union has given itself an additional twelve months to cross the 35-percent support threshold.

Delta, which is the least-unionized carrier in the country, has not yet issued a public statement, but in a notice to employees Tuesday the company said the union’s withdrawal “appear[ed] to validate the many concerns raised by many of you when the IAM filed for the election” earlier this year. Read More

Armed city employee thwarts carjacking

By  •  Local

A government employee licensed to carry a concealed weapon foiled a Good Friday carjacking at a self-service car wash by wounding the suspect and holding him at gun point until law enforcement arrived.

Police in Smyrna, Georgia, a quiet northwestern suburb of Atlanta, say that a would-be car thief attempted to steal a vehicle as its owner was cleaning it. The owner, who has also not been named by police, jumped on the hood of the vehicle.

That’s when the armed bystander, who was washing his own car in a nearby stall, drew his weapon and shot the suspect in the shoulder through the driver-side window.

The suspect, a minor, will be charged with aggravated assault and misdemeanor theft, according to police.

In a Monday email to Tipsheet, a Smyrna Police spokesman declined to specify for which city department the man works but did confirm he was not off-duty law enforcement.

Georgia law does not require handgun registration, but those wishing to carry a concealed weapon outside of their home, vehicle or place of business must apply for a firearms license from the state. Read More

Georgia school vying to host White House debate
2 years ago

Georgia school vying to host White House debate

A state university in middle Georgia is in contention to host one of four general election presidential debates next fall, the nonpartisan commission responsible for organizing the events said this week.

The Commission on Presidential Debates said Wednesday it was considering 16 possible sites, including Millegeville’s Georgia College and State University, for next year’s White House series.

The field is mostly comprised of smaller colleges and universities in the southeast and southwest. The four selected sites will be announced later this fall.

“Georgia College is pleased to be able to submit an application for consideration to host a presidential debate,” said Dr. Steve Dorman, university president, said in a statement emailed to Tipsheet. “This is in keeping with our public liberal arts mission where we embrace and promote the actions of deliberative democracy. We are excited about the possibility and would consider it a privilege to host a national political discussion.”

See the full list of contenders below the fold. Read More

Civil rights leader: arm yourself against police
2 years ago

Civil rights leader: arm yourself against police

By  •  Local

UPDATE April 1, 10:50am: A senior official at Southern Christian Leadership Conference said Wednesday that the national organization does not support the view of its Georgia chapter president that black families should exercise the right to bear arms in dealings with law enforcement.

“SCLC is firmly rooted in peace and nonviolence,” SCLC Communications Director Maynard Eaton wrote in an email to Tipsheet.

Original post follows.

The president of the Georgia chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference said Tuesday that black Americans should exercise their Second Amendment rights by defending themselves against hostile police officers.

“I am going to advocate at this point that all African Americans advocate their Second Amendment rights,” Georgia SCLC President Samuel Mosteller said at a Tuesday news conference in Atlanta. “You stand there, [police] shoot. You run, they shoot. We’re going to have a take a different tack in order to send a message to the majority community that we are not to be victims.”

A spokesman for the national SCLC, the civil rights group founded on the principle of nonviolence, did not immediately respond to an inquiry by Tipsheet Tuesday night asking if the organization stood behind the comments.

Mosteller’s remarks come after a month in which two black Georgians were fatally shot by police.

Police in Smyrna, Ga., last week shot 23-year-old Nicholas Thomas in self-defense in a failed arrest attempt. After serving an arrest warrant for a probation violation, Thomas stole a nearby Masarati and, according to authorities, used the vehicle as a weapon. He died on the scene.

Watch video of Mosteller’s comments after the jump. Read More

Programming notes: Morning Tipsheet’s back
2 years ago

Programming notes: Morning Tipsheet’s back

By  •  Local

Tomorrow, a newly-redesigned Georgia Tipsheet will relaunch its popular morning news digest, the Morning Tipsheet, a must-read distillation of all the news made by—and important to—the state’s political and media class.

If you’re already subscribed, good: you’re awesome. If not, fix that now by subscribing below the jump and becoming awesome yourself. Read More

Group running anti-RFRA ads in LA trade paper
2 years ago

Group running anti-RFRA ads in LA trade paper

A gay rights group is running advertisements on the website of a popular Los Angeles entertainment publication to brow beat the film industry to oppose more forcefully religious liberty legislation that remains stalled in the Georgia General Assembly.

The 158 feature film and television productions shot here in Georgia during the last fiscal year generated an economic impact of $5.1 billion, according to the state Department of Economic Development.

GUAD_VarietySo far, the famously vocal industry has remained silent in the debate over religious freedom, even as other major corporate sectors voiced their opposition.

But Georgia Unites Against Discrimination, a partnership between local Georgia Equality and Washington, D.C-based Human Rights Campaign, hopes the new advertising campaign will loosen Hollywood’s lips in the final two days of the legislative calendar.

The ads are running on the website of Variety, the influential trade publication of the entertainment industry. An official for the group declined to specify the scope of the campaign and instead would only say they were spending “a significant amount.”

The group is sponsoring a series of advertisements on the website, including leaderboards, skyscrapers, and a full branded skin. See the website take-over after the jump. Read More

Another collegiate sports conference ‘concerned’ with RFRA
2 years ago

Another collegiate sports conference ‘concerned’ with RFRA

The American Collegiate Rowing Association said Monday it was “deeply concerned” with religious freedom legislation under consideration in the Georgia General Assembly.

The rowing conference, which for the last four years has hosted its national championship at the Lake Lanier Olympic Venue, said in a statement that it’s worried the legislation could negatively impact the sport’s gay and lesbian coaches, athletes, and spectators.

“[W]e are deeply concerned with legislation being considered by the Georgia General Assembly … that could negatively impact our athletic community, coaching staff, and fans,” the Monday statement reads. “In particular, we are cognizant of the impact such legislation could have on the LGBT coaches, athletes, and family members who attend the regatta annually.

“ACRA does not stand for discrimination in any form, and we will continue to monitor the issue in Georgia should this legislation be signed into law.”

The group said in the four years it has hosted its championship in Gainesville, the hometown of Gov. Nathan Deal, it has injected $2 million into the local economy.

Earlier Monday the president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association told NBC that the athletic association was also “deeply concerned” that Indiana’s newly-approved religious freedom bill could become a vehicle to discriminate agains gays and lesbians.

Read ACRA’s full statement after the jump. Read More

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